&#8220;Brother Ass&#8221; or &#8220;stupid apes&#8221;? Transhumanism, the <em>Imago Dei</em> and Hollywood ARTICLE

“Brother Ass” or “stupid apes”? Transhumanism, the Imago Dei and Hollywood

As technology progresses and the culture and the Gospel continue to draw further apart, transhumanist aspirations flourish, both as a worldview and in the world of popular culture.

Gun culture and Hollywood: Turning away from violence ARTICLE

Gun culture and Hollywood: Turning away from violence

All violence is not the same. There are obvious, important differences between realistic war violence, violence in a serious social drama, cartoon violence in an action movie, horrific violence in a crime movie, slapstick violence in a comedy and so forth. Ultimately, though, I think it’s important to give ourselves regular breaks from violence of any kind. Violence is unavoidably part of human nature, but it’s far from the most interesting part.

The spiritually aware cinema of Jean&#8209;Pierre and Luc Dardenne ARTICLE

The spiritually aware cinema of Jean‑Pierre and Luc Dardenne

The Dardennes’ films generally have redemptive arcs of some sort, or at least the hope of redemption — though there are no traditional happy endings, only hopeful new beginnings. Theologians ponder the mystery of evil; the Dardennes are intrigued by the mystery of goodness.

<em>The Train</em>: When is art worth dying for? ARTICLE

The Train: When is art worth dying for?

Are manmade things ever worth dying for? How do you weigh the value of art or artifacts against the value of human life? On the one hand, human life is sacred; things are just things. On the other, the cultural heritage of a people is an irreplaceable treasure that belongs not only to the whole community, but to all future generations.

&#8220;We are not things&#8221;: <em>Mad Max: Fury Road</em> and commodifying human life ARTICLE

“We are not things”: Mad Max: Fury Road and commodifying human life

In another movie, a line like “We are not things” could be a platitude, but in the context of vividly imagined atrocities with unnerving echoes of recent headlines, this simple affirmation is fraught with topical power that has only grown in the months since the film’s theatrical debut.

Shaun the Sheep and beyond: The magic of Aardman ARTICLE

Shaun the Sheep and beyond: The magic of Aardman

For the Aardman filmmakers, it seems that inspiration and the tactile work of stop-motion go hand in hand.

Fantastic Four REVIEW

Fantastic Four (2015)

The negative buzz around the new Fantastic Four is so radioactive you could almost expect to develop superpowers just by reading about it. Ah, but that’s old-fashioned talk. In the 1960s radioactivity was mysterious and eldritch, capable of producing all manner of hulks and spider-men and what have you. In the 1950s you could even get godzillas.

Shaun the Sheep Movie REVIEW

Shaun the Sheep Movie (2015)

The world of Shaun the Sheep puts a smile on my face before anything even happens.

The greatest American films: Film critics vs. the Vatican ARTICLE

The greatest American films: Film critics vs. the Vatican

One much-noted point about the BBC list is how few Academy Award Best Picture winners made the list. Naturally, I’m interested in a different comparison: How does the BBC list compare to the 1995 Vatican film list?

Mission: Impossible &#8211; Rogue Nation REVIEW

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation (2015)

Building on the momentum of its predecessor, McQuarry whips up a similar blend of brilliantly constructed set pieces, spectacular stunts, humor, exotic locations and — well, that’s about it, really. What more do you need?